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East Sussex Beach Guide

Stretching from Brighton and Hove in the West and Camber in the East, East Sussex overlooks the English Channel.  The coastline is made up of imposing chalky cliffs and beaches of pebble and shingle kept in place by groynes.  Camber sands being the exception, with its dunes of fine golden sand.   

The South Downs National Park meets the coast between Seaford and Eastbourne where you will find the stunning chalk cliffs known as the Seven Sisters and, with its photogenic red and white striped lighthouse, Beachy Head.  The High Weald Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty - an area of clay and sand mainly covered by heath and woodland - also extends to the coastline just east of Hastings where there is a further stretch of dramatic cliffs.

Salt water ‘dipping’ was very popular in Brighton and George, then Prince of Wales, was encouraged to visit by his physician.  George really took to Brighton and built the Royal Pavilion 200 years ago as his opulent seaside pleasure palace.  It was the architect John Nash who designed the extravagant palace we know today today, in a grand Regency style with Indian and Chinese influence. A must see! 

Brighton and Easbourne both have a pleasure pier and all the attractions you’d expect of a typical seaside town - as well as rows of East Sussex beach huts.  And don’t miss the beautiful floral ‘Carpet Gardens’ on Eastbourne’s promenade! 

Other beaches that are popular with our hutters include Seaford, Bexhill and Hastings - with their shingle beaches and pretty rows of beach huts.

PROS

  • Many beaches good for fossil hunting
  • Impressive coastal scenery
  • Good for fishing and watersports
  • Water quality is generally excellent

CONS

  • Most beaches along the East Sussex coast are pebbles and shingle (not so good for sandcastles!)
  • Groynes can be unattractive
  • Be aware that rockfalls can happen from the chalk cliffs
  • Access to the beach can be via steep steps

Beaches In East Sussex

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